If you'd like to read up on your favorite organic gardening topic or learn something new, you've come to the right place!

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Culinary herbs thrive in well-draining soil and full to partial sun. Herbs are not only delicious and nutritious for humans, they also make our gardens more biodiverse by providing food and habitat for beneficial insects of all kinds.  Predatory insects like wasps, hoverflies, and beetles that eat our garden...
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This year as your tomatoes thrive in the sunniest spots in your garden beds, make a little bit of space in the sun for: Ocimum basilicum, or basil. This tasty herb has quite a history in culinary circles, medicinally and in folklore from around the world. Full of Flavors...
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Sometimes the garden produces an abundance of herbs that start to crowd out other plants and we must cut them back to make space. But why let this nutritious resource go to the compost bin? Here are some ideas for using up the harvest. Some herbs grow like weeds...
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If you grew cover crops over the winter, things are probably starting to look lively in your garden plot. Winter rye, oats, and other grains are growing taller, legumes are sending out new shoots, and the clovers are preparing to bloom. So what’s a gardener to do next? Let’s...
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Our maritime climate allows us to grow edible crops year round, but certain crops require warmer conditions and longer sun exposure that only occur in the summer months. Let’s explore cool season crops to enjoy now and how to prepare for the transition to warm season crops. Cool season...
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As we gear up for the abundance of the summer growing season in the Pacific Northwest, it’s important to start thinking about soil fertility. Good soil fertility is key to healthy plant growth, plays a significant role in climate resilience, and keeps our urban ecosystems thriving. We can’t talk...
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Spring is springing and it’s time to start planning and planting the garden. Garden planning can be a fun adventure, a time to dream about all the food and flowers you’d like to grow this year. It can also feel overwhelming, so I like to take a little time...
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As the sun travels closer to the horizon, days shorten and temperatures gradually drop. Perennials in the garden naturally slow their growth, sending energy underground or going dormant. Annual warm weather crops lose energy and begin to decompose. Garden maintenance this time of the year is focused on soil...